Minneapolis Police-Community Conflict:
Background and Prospective Resolutions

Written by Elyse Rau, Liz Stone, and Maggie Sweeney (Email: socialists_us AT yahoo.com), May 2004


"The Minneapolis Police Department has continually faced allegations of misconduct, most seriously (and alarmingly frequently) these incidents record brutality, false arrests, and even wrongful death suits have been filed!  Although a few channels exist for complaints, many community members have felt their grievances have gone unnoticed, unheard, or are not given the legitimacy or follow-up that they deserve."
- From the Overview of this Project

The following papers cover  the background of Minneapolis Police-Community conflict, current efforts to address the conflict, and the authors' additional suggested processes for transforming the conflict. Elyse Rau, Liz Stone, and Maggie Sweeney wrote the following papers as a part of a Conflict Resolution class at the University of St. Thomas in the Spring 2004 semester. 


Table of Contents:

1. Overview of  the Project
Note: This gives a two page summary of the full paper.  Written by Maggie Sweeney.

2. Background to the Conflict
   
  Introduction to the conflict
   
      - History and Origins of the Conflict
   
      - Significant Actors Involved

    Different Perspectives
        - The Minneapolis Police Department
   
     - The Minneapolis Civilian Community
   
     - The City of Minneapolis

    Structures and Organizations Relevant to the Conflict
   
     - Local Organizations
   
     - Power Structures
        - Outside Parties

    Ideologies and Globalization

    Time Line Chronology of Key Events

    Bibliography

3. Prospective Resolutions
  
Introduction
        Key Issues
  
     Theories Involved

   Options for Resolution
  
     Current approaches
  
         Federal Mediation
  
         Civil Suit against the City of Minneapolis
            Community Police Partnerships

    Further Recommendations
  
   Community Police Partnerships/Education
      Administrative Reform
      Use of the Media

     Conclusion

    Bibliography